Flappy Cupid Game

Flappy Cupid Game

Flappy Cupid Game Online - Play Free Fun Valentine's Day Games

Don't you have a date this Valentine's Day, or have Cupid hit you with his love arrows a little too much? Flappy Cupid is fun html game suitable for all ages. In this game you need to control the little cupid with tapping your finger on the screen and avoid the obstacles. Try to get as wide you can and beat your own high score. Have fun!

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How to Play Flappy Cupid Game

Tapping your finger on the screen will do the trick, unless you don't have a touch screen (then you should try using your mouse).

Who is Cupid?

In classical mythology, Cupid is the god of desire, love, attraction and affection. He is often portrayed as the son of the love goddess Venus, and is known in Latin also as Amor. n art, Cupid often appears in multiples as the Amores, or amorini in the later terminology of art history, the equivalent of the Greek erotes. Cupids are a frequent motif of both Roman art and later Western art of the classical tradition. In the 15th century, the iconography of Cupid starts to become indistinguishable from the putto.

What is so special about Cupid's Arrow

Cupid is the God of desire, erotic love, attraction and affection. The bow and arrow represent his source of power. A person, or even a deity, who is shot by Cupid's arrow is filled with uncontrollable desire. Cupid is winged, allegedly, because lovers are flighty and likely to change their minds, and boyish because love is irrational. Cupid carries two kinds of arrows, one with a sharp golden point, and the other with a blunt tip of lead. A person wounded by the golden arrow is filled with uncontrollable desire, but the one struck by the lead feels aversion and desires only to flee. The use of these arrows is described by the Latin poet Ovid in the first book of his Metamorphoses. When Apollo taunts Cupid as the lesser archer, Cupid shoots him with the golden arrow, but strikes the object of his desire, the nymph Daphne, with the lead. Trapped by Apollo's unwanted advances, Daphne prays to her father, the river god Peneus, who turns her into a laurel, the tree sacred to Apollo. It is the first of several unsuccessful or tragic love affairs for Apollo.

Cupid and Dolphins

In both ancient and later art, Cupid is often shown riding a dolphin. On ancient Roman sarcophagi, the image may represent the soul's journey, originally associated with Dionysian religion. A mosaic from late Roman Britain shows a procession emerging from the mouth of the sea god Neptune, first dolphins and then sea birds, ascending to Cupid. One interpretation of this allegory is that Neptune represents the soul's origin in the matter from which life was fashioned, with Cupid triumphing as the soul's desired destiny. In other contexts, Cupid with a dolphin recurs as a playful motif, as in garden statuary at Pompeii that shows a dolphin rescuing Cupid from an octopus, or Cupid holding a dolphin. The dolphin, often elaborated fantastically, might be constructed as a spout for a fountain.

Tags: Cupid